Who Puts A Stop To California Wage Violations
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Who Puts A Stop To California Wage Violations

Workers in California are protected against companies that do not pay them their hard earned money. The work companies find useful comes at a price every company has to pay to hold onto their reputation as a law abiding employer.

Workers in California do not have to lose their money in the bank account after their boss cheats them out of due wages and leaves them with little or no income to add to the account. An authority can step in and stop the company from paying them less money than they earned with work.

The California labor law draws lines the companies are not allowed to cross. The violations can get the company's bad practices put out of commission.

No Work Comes for Free

Any time there is a difference between the work put in as a Californian promised and the pay and benefits promised and paid in return, the boss is guilty of taking productive work for free. Any company; that get its money's worth in labor has to pay the promised wages, fringe benefits, and contributions to health plans and pensions or face the consequences. The work they found useful earns the worker money the California labor law says they have a right to have in their own account.

Working Against Violators

A full division in California government is assigned to work against those companies that take advantage of their workers and put a stop to any act done to keep hold of a worker's wages or benefits. The Division of Labor Standards Enforcement looks into any violations of the labor laws. They do diligent work to keep a watch on wages paid and the the equality between work value and payments, making sure at least a minimum wage is paid to every worker in the state.

The division officials and staff enforce the labor law. Any violators are caught and charged.

Local officials can do the work on stopping the bad business practices that violate the law. The division's officials do not replace the authority of county district attorneys and city prosecutors to prosecute a civil or criminal action with their own authority. The local prosecutors can enforce the law independently without any specific directions from the state division.

Taking Down The Enterprise A Notch

Officials at the state division and local officials take the actions needed to punish the company men and women that commit the guilty acts. They will get a judgment on the penalty justified by the violation. To make the company good again, a penalty must be paid.

Standing Up To The Company

California workers can get their share of company receipts and stop their boss's violations by suing them in court. When there are wages to be paid or a penalty to get handed down, they have a right to sue or hire an attorney to sue for them. The labor law gives authority to the state and local officials to identify violations and put a stop to them to aid workers, not take matters into their own hands and leave the workers in a position they can not act.

No Labor Law Violations

There is always a price to pay for treating a Californian as if they committed to work hard labor with no pay. Basic respect for the value of a worker's work and their responsibility to take home an income is a respect every law abiding employer gives to their workers.

Source:

California Division of Labor Standards Enforcement, The Laws Relating To The Time, Manner, and Payment of Wages (December 2010).

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